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The Nag’s Head Pub in the 1920s. The photograph is captioned ‘Four Lane Ends’ which was the official name for the area. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

Above: The Nag’s Head Pub in the 1920s. The photograph is captioned ‘Four Lane Ends’ which was the official name for the area. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

Stage 1

The Nag’s Head Inn

Before the Midland railway arrived in 1848, East Kirkby was a small rural settlement. The official name for the area was ‘Four Lane Ends’ but locally it was known as ‘The Folly’. The name dates back to the time a man called John Tomlinson built a large house on the site. Local people regarded John as foolish to build such a large building for such a small place, hence it became known as a ‘folly’. (A folly being a foolish act or idea).

‘Parents used to say to their children “Just nip out to the folly”. There were all sorts of rumours and stories going around why it had that name. I was told that a farmer had a pub at the bottom of Diamond Avenue and everyone used to say, “That won’t pay, it’ll be a folly!”

 

Fred Wetherill, Kirkby: A People’s History, 2002.

The Nag’s Head Inn, East Kirkby in the 1950s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre

The Nag’s Head Inn, East Kirkby in the 1950s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

The Public bar in The Nag’s Head Inn, East Kirkby in the 1950s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

The Public bar in The Nag’s Head Inn, East Kirkby in the 1950s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

The Nag’s Head in 1986, viewed from an upper floor of The Regent Cinema. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre

The Nag’s Head Inn, 1986, viewed from an upper floor of The Regent Cinema. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.

The Nag’s Head in the early 2000s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre

The Nag’s Head in the early 2000s. Source: Kirkby Heritage Centre.